3 Ways To Keep Blogging From Killing Your Business

Blogs are great – don’t get me wrong – but it’s just too easy to get sucked into reading too many of them and pretending you don’t notice your productivity plummet. Here are 3 simple tips for guaranteeing that getting your blog fix doesn’t result in an overdose that kills your ability to rake in the dough.

Tip #1 – Separate Business and Pleasure

You know you’re going to read some blogs simply because they are fun to read, and not because they will have a direct bearing on your business. Nothing wrong with that … unless you’re letting that entertainment time eat away at the hours you should be billable. No matter your blog reading style – RSS, email, whatever – you should keep the blogs that help you make money separate from the ones that don’t. And then be sure to put off reading the ones that don’t until you do the things that do make you money.

Tip #2 – Save Blog Reading For Breaktime

You got into business for yourself to work your own hours, but the trick of that is to actually work when you’re supposed to. Just as checking your email in small, surgical strikes is a huge productivity habit, checking blogs should follow suit. Set aside 30 minutes here or there to check the blogs you like, then get back to work when the time comes. Do this, and you’ll never kick yourself again for spending too much time on blogs.

Tip #3 – Kill Most Of Your Subscriptions

This is a hard pill for most people to swallow, since it’s just so easy to become a pack rat when it comes to the list of blogs you’re subscribed to. There are so many great blogs out there it’s hard not to subscribe to them all, especially when you’ve read articles that you know will change your business. But in reality, you’re not going to have time to read everything, or do everything. So there comes a point where you simply have to narrow your list down to the blogs that will make the most impact on your business (and your life).

Let Blogging Serve You (Rather Than The Other Way ‘Round)

These 3 tips should help you make the decisions you need to in order to keep blog reading a tool that helps your business grow far beyond your wildest hopes. Stick with the blogs that help you rock out, spend just enough time in them, and before long you’ll be seeing the huge difference that “on-purpose” blog reading can make for your business.

So What Blogs Help You Rock Out?

What’s the single most important blog that drives your business and gives you the “game changing” tips you need to slam your revenue goals each month? Give your shout out below.

Till next time,

Dave

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Dave Navarro is Freelance Folder’s Get-More-Done expert. Learn how to double your productivity in the next seven days by grabbing his free time management guide right here.
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Comments

  1. says

    This is great, Dave. Thanks. Now I’m going to spend all the time I would have spent reading blogs, reading your guide to time management. :)

    It’s like putting off doing the dishes to read Getting Things Done.

    Thanks, though. Seriously. I really needed this one today.

  2. says

    Great article, Dave! How you choose to read blogs makes a big difference. I stay productive with Google Reader.

    I go through and star the posts that matter (most don’t) and then mark all as read. This clears the screen, and then I go check out the starred posts.

    Since commenting is a natural extension of this, and an important aspect of marketing and networking, I batch feed reading and commenting tasks and treat it as a business activity, not a break activity or something done just for pleasure (although I do enjoy it).

    Even so, it is still very easy to get sucked in, and before I know it, I have wound up somewhere on YouTube, so this is all still wonderful advice.

  3. says

    I definitely subscribe to points #1 and #2! I don’t even dare venture out into the blogosphere unless I’m on breaktime! For me, blogs are fun-time. I so nerdy that I fun time for me means talking shop with other entrepreneurs about business. :)

    I constantly add subscriptions though… the only subscriptions I’ve killed are the ones that post recapped industry news 10 times a day that I could have found out about by just checking Google News.

    Freelance Folder is definitely one blog that I read constantly as well as Micheal Martine’s Remarkablogger and Itty Biz (for a GREAT laugh every time!) It’s kind of interesting that all of the blogs in your links are in my top list… I’ve interviewed both Nate and Liz about blogging and read their blogs… and you know I think you’re a rockstar. I also really like anything by Chris Garrett…and Shane and Peter…. and Freelance Switch… and Steve Pavlina… aaahhh! This is why I need to save blogging for personal time :D

  4. says

    HI Dave!
    I couldn’t agree with you more. When I was working with editors just starting out, one of their first discoveries would be the problem of managing the interruptions and distractions that kept getting between them and their work.

    When they put email and returning phone calls — the equivalent of reading blogs and commenting — after the key work was done. Productivity always went way up. :)

  5. says

    @Naomi -
    No no no no …. you’re going to *invest* time reading my guide to time management … and you’re going to make sure you get a hefty ROI on that time. :-)

    @Michael M. – thanks for the kind words!

    @Michael C. – then I guess this is a sign – you need to make sure FreelanceFolder is one of the blogs you keep, and that you get that time management guide right away!

    @Christine – thanks for your props – now I have m comment fix taken care of (ahhh, sweet, sweet comments). Glad to hear you’ve already got things organized blog-wise.

    @Liz –
    Peter Drucker said something along the lines of “90% of management is not getting in the way of people doing their work” … as you pointed out in your comment, it’s the same concept when managing your own productivity. Thanks for stopping by.

  6. says

    Good post. I’m definitely on board with No. 1 and No. 2.

    I take a slightly different approach, but that’s because blogging is my business. I subscribe to a lot of blogs, but I don’t read any of them every day. I focus on blog posts, so if a title or a subject matter covered in a particular post interests me then I’ll read it even though I may not have read anything from a particular blog in a while. That said, my favorite blogs to read are:

    SearchEngineOptimizationJournal.com
    Remarkablogger.com
    FreelanceFolder.com
    Mashable
    MarketingPilgrim.com
    John Chow
    Lorelle on WordPress
    Anything from Jayde

  7. says

    I find that I skim alot. I subscribe to alot of blogs, but I don’t read everything. I skip posts that I don’t think will benefit me now or soon.

    I really like the blog: http://www.skelliewag.org

    I find the writing style awsome. The content is top notch. The writer really knows how to ask thought provoking questions. Lots of commenters.

  8. says

    Agree Sean! Skelliwag is awesome… and I really enjoy your blog too… I’ve been wanting to venture into Illustrator, but haven’t had a clue where to begin! Your blog seems to make the whole thing seem much more manageable…

  9. says

    Feed read pack rat… Oh, I can relate. I collect blogs to read like it’s my last chance on earth. I even collect blogs I don’t like, for cripes’ sake.

    The problem with ditching the ones that I never read, always snort at, and generally don’t like? What if I unsubscribe and one day I happen to miss the ONE, single most brilliant, genius post that blog happens to write…? What if everyone discovers that gem of a treasure before I do? What if I miss it? Out of 1,589 posts, that ONE post might change my life!

    I can see it in five years – Feed Readers Anonymous…

  10. says

    Reading, managing, and making blogs is also part of my job. Constantly keeping up with the blog world is absolutely necessary for my job. I used to enjoy reading, but now it is serious business. For professional bloggers, it is opposite: during break times, you should go outside and give your eyes a rest!

  11. says

    I’ve learned more from Skellie (Skelliewag.org) than I have any other blog this year, I think. Her articles are all very well written, thoughtful, and helpful. I find that some of the “big” sites are getting pretty repetitive even after just six months of reading.

    I have separate folders for the types of blogs I read — I have blogs about biking and RVing, so I keep feed folders for search results as well as separate folders for others in my niches. It helps because then I don’t feel obliged to read everything every day.

  12. says

    Very good points. Thanks and dugg. For me, it’s the thought of maybe, perhaps, finding that little gold nugget of information that most will overlook, so that I can have an unfair advantage.

  13. says

    It’s so easy to get addicted to reading blogs sometimes. Especially when you have a number of bloggers you admire… In fact, you’ll never notice how many hours you’ve been staring at the monitor screen unless someone calls your attention.

  14. says

    Great post!! I love Tip #2 – Save Blog Reading For Breaktime and #3, Killing Subscriptions, but #3 is so hard to do. I figure if I let them pile up I will read them at some point, but it never happens. I feel like I am missing out on things though :(

    We need 48 hour days … That’s the ticket!!!!

  15. says

    Hey guys,

    I’m new to blogging and have just created my first site….

    What do you think is the best blogging tool for a fashion blog?

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